STRAIGHT WHITE MEN

About The Show

 

Following an acclaimed Broadway run, the hilarious Straight White Men arrives at Southwark Playhouse for four weeks only.

 

As Ed, a widower, prepares to celebrate Christmas, he calls his three grown sons back to the family home. Games are played, Chinese food is ordered, and brotherly pranks and trashtalk distract them from the on-going issue that threatens to ruin the festivities: when identity matters and privilege is a problem, what is a straight white man to do?

 

Raucous, surprising and fearless—the ever-adventurous Young Jean Lee takes an outside look at the traditional father/son play narrative, shedding new light on a story we think we know all too well. Lee compassionately investigates straight white male identity in a way that is as hilarious as it is revealing.

Charlie Condou (playing Matt) is a British actor, columnist and LGBTQ+ rights activist best known for playing Marcus Dent in Coronation Street and Ben Sherwood in Holby City. Simon Rouse (playing Ed) is best known for playing DCI Jack Meadows in The Bill. They are joined by Simon Haines, Alex Mugnaioni (Romeo & Juliet, National Theatre), Kamari Roméo (The Bear/The Proposal, Young Vic) and Kim Tatum (Killer Tongue).

Cast includes:

 

Charlie Condou       Simon Haines

 

 

Alex Mugnaioni      Kamari Romeo

Simon Rouse         Kim Tatum

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Creative Team

Writer

Young Jean Lee

Set Designer

Suzu Sakai

Sound Designer

MWEN

Producer

David Adkin

 

 

Director
Steven Kunis

Costume Designer

Beth Colley

Casting

Lucy Casson

Production Co-Ordinator
Adam Line for

David Adkin Limited

 

 

Movement Director
Christina Fulcher

Lighting Designer

Rajiv Pattani

Simon Rouse.jpg

Producer

David Adkin

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Lee’s play is funny, well-observed, often surprisingly gentle, and refreshingly nuanced. Straight White Men: I’m here for it.’ 

Evening Standard

 timely identity study that gives a powerful critique of 21st-century white male psychology’ 

The Guardian

‘Ingenious, provocative and richly entertaining’ 

The Independent